My Resolution: More than just Words

My Resolution: More than just Words

Up to the last week of 2017, I could not decide on a New Year resolution. At some point I stopped trying and chose instead to reflect on past resolutions. Soon enough, I realized that I had not honored my previous commitments beyond the first 2 weeks of January. This revelation forced me to take a good look at the reasons for my failure, and here is what I learned:

  1. I never fully understood the reason I made a particular promise to myself.
  2. I failed to acknowledge the challenges of committing to my decision.
  3. I lacked a strong incentive to stay engaged.

If you can relate to the above situation, whether you are still figuring out your New Year resolution, or making plans to improve your behavior or lifestyle, consider these points:

  • Acknowledge that decisions are easy to make and hard to keep. They require adhering to new habits or breaking old ones. It is hard to kill old habits, but it is harder to consciously acquire good ones. Be conscious always that, embracing or letting go of habits takes time, effort, and patience.
  • Be fully aware of the circumstances surrounding your decision. A commitment may seem simple when you make it, but its execution may entail major changes and have far reaching effects; understanding it would  ensure physical and mental readiness.
  • Lay down a plan to succeed and ask yourself what it will take to honor your promise? Do you have a fear that is a major obstacle to your progress? You could challenge yourself to face it and move forward. Is there a bigger dream that your success will help you fulfil?

Applying yourself to anything is the only way you get it done. It is up to you to look for ways to make your desire so strong that backing out is not an option.

“Commitment is an act, not a word.”

— Jean Paul Sartre

12 thoughts on “My Resolution: More than just Words

  • January 14, 2018 at 8:30 pm
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    Great and educative article! I think it’s safe to say that many of us can’t stick to our resolutions. We set too many resolutions and end up getting derailed by small failures. It might be a good thing to stop focusing on perfection which is unattainable.

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    • Memie
      January 17, 2018 at 8:29 pm
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      I love that piece about perfection. We can only strive for excellence.
      Thanks, Laura.

      Reply
  • January 17, 2018 at 6:10 am
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    Very true and enriching article. True, many people make these new year resolutions. this in itself is a good thing because that means they acknowledge their problems or issues, and want to change them and acquire new habits. I think the problem sometimes is that the resolution list is rather very long. If we try to take one or two pertinent resolutions at a time, it will be easier to keep, than making an endless list that cannot even be remembered once its written.

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    • Memie
      January 17, 2018 at 8:23 pm
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      Quite true, Yvonne. When focus is spread around, it looses its strength. Thank you.

      Reply
  • January 17, 2018 at 12:12 pm
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    One resolution that i can recommend would be, try to learn how to meditate, your article is on point, in my opinion. Awareness comes when the mind is rested. I practice Buddhism for 15 years and i still have issues trying to calm my mind. But kudos on your blog!

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    • Memie
      January 17, 2018 at 8:08 pm
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      Honest reflection can only be achieved within a quiet mind. Thanks, Mikel.

      Reply
  • January 18, 2018 at 2:44 pm
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    True indeed… “Easier said than done” but again I think it is better to start with smaller and simpler resolutions. Once we achieve them they might act as an encouragement doe further and more complex self discipline.

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    • Memie
      January 18, 2018 at 6:52 pm
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      Thanks, for sharing Miss Dee. Breaking down goals into manageable objectives certainly makes them easier to accomplish.

      Reply
  • January 21, 2018 at 7:09 pm
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    Kudos! Thanks for this inspiring article. From my experience, I would say most of the time our resolutions are incidental and are not products of reflection. This may signify that we are ambitious but not realistic enough to match our ambition. We need to note that we can’t change our mode of life at a go, so waiting for the end or the beginning of the year is not a smart idea; resolutions should be the result of reflexivity which could start any time during the year, taking it one step at a time. We may want to choose the most important goals: write them on paper or print them out, keep them in an accessible place in the office or at home or voice them to a close relative or friend. Seeing it all the time will engrave it in our subconscious mind and serve as a reminder and motivation as well. We should also keep in mind that resolutions should be measurable and realistic.

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    • Memie
      January 21, 2018 at 8:50 pm
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      Thank you, Kareen for bringing these different perspectives to light. Writing your goals down and going back to them often is a great way of staying on track.

      Reply
  • January 22, 2018 at 9:30 am
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    In my perspective, I would see resolutions as a way to make people feel better about themselves. In a society where distractions are dominant, it makes it even harder to commit to said resolutions. For example; A person trying to start dieting but sees ads and fast food chains all around or a spender who sees all the distraction he uses and buys or even someone tryna to improve their persona while society has a different image of that person. All of this depends on self-control. Unfortunately, this is a virtue that even I fight to obtain as it is hard to leave old habit to garner new ones. Enough said though, the only way to change is to start step by step. Conquering the little battles helps to get ready for the bigger ones

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    • Memie
      January 29, 2018 at 11:01 pm
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      Thanks, BLK6CAN. The ability to commit to anything is determined by how much self-control we have. Like most things, it can be learned. Take it a step at a time just like you said.

      Reply

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